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Wyoming - Motorcycle Roads and Riders

Wyoming - Motorcycle Roads and Riders

Wyoming is one of the most beautiful states in the nation and tops many a motorcyclist’s list of must-ride places. Its diverse terrain includes the Rocky Mountains and the High Plains, and it is home to the stunning Teton National Forest and the most unique national park in the United States, as well as its first -- Yellowstone.

One of Wyoming’s most recommended routes is the 47-mile-long Chief Joseph Scenic Highway. This road, which is also known as Wyoming Highway 296, has breathtaking panoramic views of majestic mountains and beautiful valleys. Chief Joseph Scenic Highway is named after the famous Nez Perce Indian chief who led his tribe through this area as they fled the US Calvary, who was trying to capture them to place them on a reservation. This route, which connects the town of Cody via US 120 to the Beartooth Highway, boasts numerous switchbacks and the highest bridge in Wyoming, the Sunlight Creek Bridge.

Riders wanting more of the same spectacular ride can continue on the Beartooth Highway and Beartooth Pass, which is also known as US 212, for another approximately 50 miles. This is a route filled with a lot of steep inclines and declines, numerous hairpin curves and switchbacks. The Beartooth is the highest elevation highway in Wyoming and Montana.

Another fun road for bikers is the Sylvan Pass or Wyoming 14/20/16, which is located in the Absaroka Range and is the only way to access Yellowstone’s east exit. This is a fun ride that has some sweepers, as well as some technical portions. Riders should be aware that a segment of this route does run through Yellowstone, albeit a less visited area of the national park. Still, bikers need to be on the lookout for tourists and wildlife, both of which have a tendency to make inexplicable moves into the paths of motorcycles. Park Rangers can also ruin a great trip, so watching the speed limit is important in this section. The Sylvan Pass ends in Cody.

A popular ride from the famous Sturgis motorcycle rally every year makes a loop from that South Dakota town to Wyoming’s famous Devils Tower and back. Devils Tower, which is a 1267-foot natural monolith that seems to jut out of nowhere, was America’s First National Monument and played a large part in the movie “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.” From Sturgis, riders would take I-90 west across the border to Wyoming to Route 111 north to Aladdin. In Aladdin, riders then head take Route 24 to Devils Tower National Monument.

To get back to Sturgis, riders need to take Route 24 south until they reach US 14 east. In Sundance Wyoming, riders then pick up I-90 back to Sturgis. This is a nice ride through some rolling hills and past beautiful scenery.

Every year thousands of motorcyclists pass through Wyoming on their way to the mother of all motorcycle rallies in Sturgis,South Dakota. But Wyoming also has some fun events as well. One of the largest is held in Hulett, Wyoming, a small town of 409. Every year, this little town throws the Ham 'N Jam event, which attracts thousands of riders from the monstrous South Dakota rally.

 

 

Disclaimer:  All information is provided as a service to motorcycle riders, and the opinions expressed here are subjective. Although we have tried to research this information thoroughly, it is possible that changing circumstances can cause this information to become inaccurate. In addition, the conditions and roads described can change without notice for a number of reasons, including closings, weather conditions and maintenance. Motorcycle events such as rallies and rides may also be cancelled or dates changed without notice, as well. This site is not responsible for these types of circumstances, which are beyond our control, and riders relying on this information will be doing so at their own risk. This site is not liable for any actions a rider takes based on the information provided here.  Please consult other sources before heading out on these roads and do not use the directions given here as a map, as again, circumstances may have affected their accuracy.